Fuck Yeah Herpetology

earthandanimals:


Nile Crocodile by Michael Poliza

Reblogged from earthandanimals

earthandanimals:

Nile Crocodile by 

slither-and-scales:

Panther Chameleon by Michael H

Reblogged from earthandanimals

slither-and-scales:

Panther Chameleon by 

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Brachylophus by Bee Kay)

Reblogged from komainucalamity

llbwwb:

(via 500px / Brachylophus by Bee Kay)

Reblogged from lostboys14

rhamphotheca:

An arboreal lungless salamander, Bolitoglossa alberchi, sits on a leaf in the forest at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico.
photograph by Jefferey Himmelstein
(via: Herpetofauna Mexicana)

Reblogged from rhamphotheca

rhamphotheca:

An arboreal lungless salamander, Bolitoglossa alberchi, sits on a leaf in the forest at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico.

photograph by Jefferey Himmelstein

(via: Herpetofauna Mexicana)

"Can you be paid a stable income to be a herpetologist and work with conservation?"

Asked by Anonymous

It depends on what you want to do and what you consider a stable income. You usually require a masters degree for most positions that involve research directly (with a few exceptions) and those positions pay okay if you can snag one. You probably shouldn’t expect too much more than 40k a year (and that’s the high end in my experience). Most entry level positions are ~25k with a bachelors and maybe ~30k with a masters. If you have a PhD and want to go into academia it can be very competitive but you would expect more income.
(These numbers may also be on a case to case basis of which there are definitely outliers in the high and low ends. I’ve had a $10/hr job with a bachelors in my field that required my degree. It also varies depending on where you live and I live in a moderately priced area.)

libutron:

Chinese Stripe-necked Turtle
Mauremys sinensis (Geoemydidae), commonly referred as Chinese Stripe-necked Turtle, is an Endangered species native to China with a modest population in Viet Nam.
This especially striking freshwater turtle can be distinguished by the fine yellow and black lines that decorate the neck, for which this turtle is named.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©FuYi Chen
Locality: Taipei, China

Reblogged from allaboutreptiles

libutron:

Chinese Stripe-necked Turtle

Mauremys sinensis (Geoemydidae), commonly referred as Chinese Stripe-necked Turtle, is an Endangered species native to China with a modest population in Viet Nam.

This especially striking freshwater turtle can be distinguished by the fine yellow and black lines that decorate the neck, for which this turtle is named.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©FuYi Chen

Locality: Taipei, China

fox-power:

More photos on http://fox-power.tumblr.com/

Reblogged from heckyeahreptiles

fox-power:

More photos on http://fox-power.tumblr.com/

93527:

(via 500px / Jararaca by Octavio Campos Salles)

Reblogged from heckyeahreptiles

93527:

(via 500px / Jararaca by Octavio Campos Salles)

dendroica:

American Toad (by Dendroica cerulea)

Reblogged from dendroica

dendroica:

American Toad (by Dendroica cerulea)