Fuck Yeah Herpetology

tangledupinblue8:

My dad even saw a pretty snake while they were away.

Reblogged from adorablesnakes

tangledupinblue8:

My dad even saw a pretty snake while they were away.

Reblogged from herphard

exotic-venom:

Lachesis melanocephala - Black-headed bushmaster

markscherz:

Uroplatus sp., probably U. phantasticus but could also be U. malama
Photo by Dennis H Miller.

Reblogged from herphard

markscherz:

Uroplatus sp., probably U. phantasticus but could also be U. malama

Photo by Dennis H Miller.

gears-keep-turning:

Mordecai


Aww house snakes

Reblogged from herphard

gears-keep-turning:

Mordecai

Aww house snakes

Reblogged from herphard

(Source: camillacacco)

cananimalsbemoral:

Into the mouth of the caiman by Luciano Candisani (Brazil) Motionless but alert, a yacare caiman waits, like a small tyrannosaurus for fish to come within snapping reach, says Luciano. Caimans are usually seen floating passively on the surface. Under the water, it’s another story. It is this secret life that has fascinated Luciano ever since he first came face to face with a caiman while snorkelling. Once he had recovered from the shock, he realised that the reptile was neither aggressive nor fearful and that he could approach it. Luciano now regularly documents the underwater life of caimans in the shallow, murky waters of Brazil’s Pantanal (the biggest wetland in the world), which contains the largest single crocodilian population on Earth. Most aren’t aggressive, but some individuals can be. The safest way to get close is when they are concentrating on a shoal of fish, says Luciano

Reblogged from herphard

cananimalsbemoral:

Into the mouth of the caiman by Luciano Candisani (Brazil) Motionless but alert, a yacare caiman waits, like a small tyrannosaurus for fish to come within snapping reach, says Luciano. Caimans are usually seen floating passively on the surface. Under the water, it’s another story. It is this secret life that has fascinated Luciano ever since he first came face to face with a caiman while snorkelling. Once he had recovered from the shock, he realised that the reptile was neither aggressive nor fearful and that he could approach it. Luciano now regularly documents the underwater life of caimans in the shallow, murky waters of Brazil’s Pantanal (the biggest wetland in the world), which contains the largest single crocodilian population on Earth. Most aren’t aggressive, but some individuals can be. The safest way to get close is when they are concentrating on a shoal of fish, says Luciano

(Source: theguardian.com)

reptiglo:

Rhacodactylus leachianus by Thor Hakonsen on Flickr.

Reblogged from internetcooldad

reptiglo:

Rhacodactylus leachianus by Thor Hakonsen on Flickr.

nanniloehr:

libutron:

Big-eye Rat Snake - Ptyas dhumnades
Commonly referred to as Big-eye Rat Snake, Ptyas dhumnades (Colubridae), native to southern China, Vietnam and Taiwan, is a large snake up to 220 cm in total length. Its eyes are very large, with the iris dark gray to black dappled dirty yellow to tan, and the pupil is round, black, surrounded by ring of dirty yellow. 
This is the fastest snake in Asia, and due to its large eyes probably among the ones with the best reaction - a combination that makes it hard to observe and even harder to catch.
The snake’s meat finds use in Chinese medicine, where it is prescribed as a treatment for leprosy as well as for a host of more general ailments.
Synonym: Zaocys dhumnades
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo credit: ©Jinn Hua | Locality: Fataan, Taiwan (2008)

Hmm. Sounds like more chinese medicine bull to me. I don’t get it, the way animals are used is generally terrible, but some of the knowledge about plants used in Chinese medicine is amazing!

It’s definitely not an effective treatment, for sure.

Reblogged from nanniloehr

nanniloehr:

libutron:

Big-eye Rat Snake - Ptyas dhumnades

Commonly referred to as Big-eye Rat Snake, Ptyas dhumnades (Colubridae), native to southern China, Vietnam and Taiwan, is a large snake up to 220 cm in total length. Its eyes are very large, with the iris dark gray to black dappled dirty yellow to tan, and the pupil is round, black, surrounded by ring of dirty yellow. 

This is the fastest snake in Asia, and due to its large eyes probably among the ones with the best reaction - a combination that makes it hard to observe and even harder to catch.

The snake’s meat finds use in Chinese medicine, where it is prescribed as a treatment for leprosy as well as for a host of more general ailments.

Synonym: Zaocys dhumnades

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©Jinn Hua | Locality: Fataan, Taiwan (2008)

Hmm. Sounds like more chinese medicine bull to me. I don’t get it, the way animals are used is generally terrible, but some of the knowledge about plants used in Chinese medicine is amazing!

It’s definitely not an effective treatment, for sure.

10bullets:

A worldgorger dragon… (by Alejandro Arteaga)

Reblogged from snakefanciers

10bullets:

A worldgorger dragon… (by Alejandro Arteaga)

tiny-creatures:

Keelback snake (Tropidonophis mairii) by Kristian Bell on Flickr.

Reblogged from markscherz

tiny-creatures:

Keelback snake (Tropidonophis mairii) by Kristian Bell on Flickr.