Fuck Yeah Herpetology

palaeopedia:

The thick-headed Lizard, Pachycephalosaurus (1931)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : OrnithischiaFamily : PachycephalosauridaeGenus : PachycephalosaurusSpecies : P. wyomingensis
Late Cretaceous (69,9 - 66 Ma)
4,5 m long and 450 kg (size)
Niobara county, USA (map)

As befits a dinosaur named after its massive skull—which was 10 inches thick on the front and forward side of its head—most of what we know about Pachycephalosaurus is based on skull specimens. Still, that hasn’t kept paleontologists from making educated guesses: it’s believed that Pachycephalosaurus had a squat, thick trunk, five-fingered hands, and an upright stance. This dinosaur has given its name to an entire breed of odd-looking boneheads, the pachycephalosaurs, other famous examples of which include Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch (the “horned demon from the river of hell”).
Why did Pachycephalosaurus have such a thick skull? As with most such anatomical quirks in the animal kingdom, the popular explanation is that the males of this genus (and possibly the females as well) evolved big skulls because they head-butted each other for dominance and the right to mate; they may also have gently, or not so gently, butted their heads against the tender flanks of menacing tyrannosaurs and raptors. Whatever the case, Pachycephalosaurus’ block-shaped bean clearly didn’t protect it from extinction; this was one of the last dinosaurs on earth when a meteor impact 65 million years ago rendered the entire breed extinct.
As with another family of ornamented dinosaurs, the ceratopsians, there’s a fair amount of confusion about pachycephalosaurs in general (and Pachycephalosaurus in particular) at the genus and species level. It may well be the case that many “diagnosed” genera of pachycephalosaurs actually represent the growth stages of already-named species; for example, both Dracorex and Stygimoloch may well turn out to belong under the Pachycephalosaurus umbrella (which will no doubt be a major disappointment to Harry Potter fans!).

Reblogged from palaeopedia

palaeopedia:

The thick-headed Lizard, Pachycephalosaurus (1931)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Ornithischia
Family : Pachycephalosauridae
Genus : Pachycephalosaurus
Species : P. wyomingensis

  • Late Cretaceous (69,9 - 66 Ma)
  • 4,5 m long and 450 kg (size)
  • Niobara county, USA (map)

As befits a dinosaur named after its massive skull—which was 10 inches thick on the front and forward side of its head—most of what we know about Pachycephalosaurus is based on skull specimens. Still, that hasn’t kept paleontologists from making educated guesses: it’s believed that Pachycephalosaurus had a squat, thick trunk, five-fingered hands, and an upright stance. This dinosaur has given its name to an entire breed of odd-looking boneheads, the pachycephalosaurs, other famous examples of which include Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch (the “horned demon from the river of hell”).

Why did Pachycephalosaurus have such a thick skull? As with most such anatomical quirks in the animal kingdom, the popular explanation is that the males of this genus (and possibly the females as well) evolved big skulls because they head-butted each other for dominance and the right to mate; they may also have gently, or not so gently, butted their heads against the tender flanks of menacing tyrannosaurs and raptors. Whatever the case, Pachycephalosaurus’ block-shaped bean clearly didn’t protect it from extinction; this was one of the last dinosaurs on earth when a meteor impact 65 million years ago rendered the entire breed extinct.

As with another family of ornamented dinosaurs, the ceratopsians, there’s a fair amount of confusion about pachycephalosaurs in general (and Pachycephalosaurus in particular) at the genus and species level. It may well be the case that many “diagnosed” genera of pachycephalosaurs actually represent the growth stages of already-named species; for example, both Dracorex and Stygimoloch may well turn out to belong under the Pachycephalosaurus umbrella (which will no doubt be a major disappointment to Harry Potter fans!).

Reblogged from earthandanimals

awkwardsituationist:

photos by (click pic) timm schamberger, julia ormond, gary carter and jeff clow. (more precious lil buddies)

creatures-alive:

Corallus caninus (Emerald tree boa) by Fredrik Tegnér on Flickr.

Reblogged from morelia-viridis

creatures-alive:

Corallus caninus (Emerald tree boa) by Fredrik Tegnér on Flickr.

averymuether:

This is another info graphic I did advocating for snakes. When spring comes around snakes start to come out of hibernation and sometimes will end up in people’s backyards. Snakes around this time are killed left and right, whether it is completely harmless or venomous. I want to urge people to learn about snakes and also to leave snakes alone!

Reblogged from shadowboa

averymuether:

This is another info graphic I did advocating for snakes. When spring comes around snakes start to come out of hibernation and sometimes will end up in people’s backyards. Snakes around this time are killed left and right, whether it is completely harmless or venomous. I want to urge people to learn about snakes and also to leave snakes alone!

nemi-black:

Desert rain frog (Breviceps macrops) —so cute! <3

Reblogged from crotalinae

nemi-black:

Desert rain frog (Breviceps macrops) —so cute! <3

astronomy-to-zoology:

Sotmatosuchis inermis
…was a very large (10m/32ft) stomatosuchid crocodilian from the late Cretaceous of Egypt. Unlike many other crocodyliforms it is largely unknown what exactly S. inermis ate. Its flattened skull had a long, lid-like snout which was filled with small conical teeth. Some theorize that the mandible might of been toothless and supported a pelican-like throat pouch. 
Sadly the only known specimen (a large skull, collected by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer) was destroyed when the Munich Museum was bombed in 1944.
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Crocodylomorpha-Neosuchia-Stomatosuchidae-Sotmatosuchis-S. inermis
Image: Dmitry Bogdanov

Reblogged from scientificillustration

astronomy-to-zoology:

Sotmatosuchis inermis

…was a very large (10m/32ft) stomatosuchid crocodilian from the late Cretaceous of Egypt. Unlike many other crocodyliforms it is largely unknown what exactly S. inermis ate. Its flattened skull had a long, lid-like snout which was filled with small conical teeth. Some theorize that the mandible might of been toothless and supported a pelican-like throat pouch. 

Sadly the only known specimen (a large skull, collected by German paleontologist Ernst Stromer) was destroyed when the Munich Museum was bombed in 1944.

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Crocodylomorpha-Neosuchia-Stomatosuchidae-Sotmatosuchis-S. inermis

Image: Dmitry Bogdanov

1800daniel:

Crotalus ruber - red diamond rattlesnake
Today felt like a good day to look for an item that has eluded me. I knew it was somewhere in one of my favorite spots, since I found rattlesnake skin several months ago. We got a nice soaking rain a few days ago and the weather was right so after class I scarfed down some lunch and jumped into the bush.I was soon rewarded with the snake I had in mind. And a big one at that. This guy easily measured a meter long, definitely more (I wasn’t fool enough to try to straighten it out).  It stared me down and gave me the signature warning but never struck even as I approached closer.
Rattlesnakes are by far my favorite reptiles. More photos of this beauty will be posted later.
Riverside County, California

Reblogged from crispysnakes

1800daniel:

Crotalus ruber - red diamond rattlesnake

Today felt like a good day to look for an item that has eluded me. I knew it was somewhere in one of my favorite spots, since I found rattlesnake skin several months ago. We got a nice soaking rain a few days ago and the weather was right so after class I scarfed down some lunch and jumped into the bush.
I was soon rewarded with the snake I had in mind. And a big one at that. This guy easily measured a meter long, definitely more (I wasn’t fool enough to try to straighten it out).  It stared me down and gave me the signature warning but never struck even as I approached closer.

Rattlesnakes are by far my favorite reptiles. More photos of this beauty will be posted later.

Riverside County, California

iainyork:

Blue Lizard by Cam Held Photo on Flickr.http://iainyork.tumblr.com/

Reblogged from heckyeahreptiles

iainyork:

Blue Lizard by Cam Held Photo on Flickr.

http://iainyork.tumblr.com/

marjoleinhoekendijk:

Uroplatus phantasticus by Thor Hakonsen on Flickr.

Reblogged from minervasbiscuits

marjoleinhoekendijk:

Uroplatus phantasticus by Thor Hakonsen on Flickr.

(Source: creatures-alive)

clockwork-serpent:

Canopy Chondros

Reblogged from clockwork-serpent

clockwork-serpent:

Canopy Chondros