Fuck Yeah Herpetology

sarawr-monster:

'fotografias3_09', gorgeous photograph of a Varanus salvator taken in Lumpini Park, Bangkok, Thailand by tcbalby on Flickr [Source]
This photograph is awesome! <3

Reblogged from heckyeahreptiles

sarawr-monster:

'fotografias3_09', gorgeous photograph of a Varanus salvator taken in Lumpini Park, Bangkok, Thailand by tcbalby on Flickr [Source]

This photograph is awesome! <3

ata-raxie:

Two species of aquatic snakes (by mattdil)

Reblogged from komainucalamity

ata-raxie:

Two species of aquatic snakes (by mattdil)

Reblogged from reptiglo

reptiglo:

Vietnamese Mossy Frog

They are known to be ventriloquists, as they can “throw” their voices. To complete its disguise as inanimate vegetation, it tucks in its limbs and “plays dead” when startled. As you can see from photos, no two mossy frogs ever look exactly the same.

Source

rhamphotheca:

A Vietnamese Mossy Frog (Theloderma corticale), Denver Zoo, CO, USA
* a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is found in Northern Vietnam and possibly China. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marches, and rocky areas. It is a semi-aquatic, semi-arboreal species that is threatened by habitat loss… (read more: Wikipedia)
(photo: A. Jaszlicks)

Reblogged from earthandanimals

rhamphotheca:

A Vietnamese Mossy Frog (Theloderma corticale), Denver Zoo, CO, USA

* a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is found in Northern Vietnam and possibly China. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montanes, freshwater marshes, intermittent freshwater marches, and rocky areas. It is a semi-aquatic, semi-arboreal species that is threatened by habitat loss… (read more: Wikipedia)

(photo: A. Jaszlicks)

creatures-alive:

(via 500px / Emerald Basilik by Juan Carlos Vindas)

Reblogged from earthandanimals

creatures-alive:

(via 500px / Emerald Basilik by Juan Carlos Vindas)

palaeopedia:

The thick-headed Lizard, Pachycephalosaurus (1931)
Phylum&#160;: ChordataClass&#160;: ReptiliaOrder&#160;: OrnithischiaFamily&#160;: PachycephalosauridaeGenus&#160;: PachycephalosaurusSpecies&#160;: P. wyomingensis
Late Cretaceous (69,9 - 66 Ma)
4,5 m long and 450 kg (size)
Niobara county, USA (map)

As befits a dinosaur named after its massive skull—which was 10 inches thick on the front and forward side of its head—most of what we know about Pachycephalosaurus is based on skull specimens. Still, that hasn’t kept paleontologists from making educated guesses: it’s believed that Pachycephalosaurus had a squat, thick trunk, five-fingered hands, and an upright stance. This dinosaur has given its name to an entire breed of odd-looking boneheads, the pachycephalosaurs, other famous examples of which include Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch (the “horned demon from the river of hell”).
Why did Pachycephalosaurus have such a thick skull? As with most such anatomical quirks in the animal kingdom, the popular explanation is that the males of this genus (and possibly the females as well) evolved big skulls because they head-butted each other for dominance and the right to mate; they may also have gently, or not so gently, butted their heads against the tender flanks of menacing tyrannosaurs and raptors. Whatever the case, Pachycephalosaurus’ block-shaped bean clearly didn’t protect it from extinction; this was one of the last dinosaurs on earth when a meteor impact 65 million years ago rendered the entire breed extinct.
As with another family of ornamented dinosaurs, the ceratopsians, there’s a fair amount of confusion about pachycephalosaurs in general (and Pachycephalosaurus in particular) at the genus and species level. It may well be the case that many “diagnosed” genera of pachycephalosaurs actually represent the growth stages of already-named species; for example, both Dracorex and Stygimoloch may well turn out to belong under the Pachycephalosaurus umbrella (which will no doubt be a major disappointment to Harry Potter fans!).

Reblogged from palaeopedia

palaeopedia:

The thick-headed Lizard, Pachycephalosaurus (1931)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Ornithischia
Family : Pachycephalosauridae
Genus : Pachycephalosaurus
Species : P. wyomingensis

  • Late Cretaceous (69,9 - 66 Ma)
  • 4,5 m long and 450 kg (size)
  • Niobara county, USA (map)

As befits a dinosaur named after its massive skull—which was 10 inches thick on the front and forward side of its head—most of what we know about Pachycephalosaurus is based on skull specimens. Still, that hasn’t kept paleontologists from making educated guesses: it’s believed that Pachycephalosaurus had a squat, thick trunk, five-fingered hands, and an upright stance. This dinosaur has given its name to an entire breed of odd-looking boneheads, the pachycephalosaurs, other famous examples of which include Dracorex hogwartsia and Stygimoloch (the “horned demon from the river of hell”).

Why did Pachycephalosaurus have such a thick skull? As with most such anatomical quirks in the animal kingdom, the popular explanation is that the males of this genus (and possibly the females as well) evolved big skulls because they head-butted each other for dominance and the right to mate; they may also have gently, or not so gently, butted their heads against the tender flanks of menacing tyrannosaurs and raptors. Whatever the case, Pachycephalosaurus’ block-shaped bean clearly didn’t protect it from extinction; this was one of the last dinosaurs on earth when a meteor impact 65 million years ago rendered the entire breed extinct.

As with another family of ornamented dinosaurs, the ceratopsians, there’s a fair amount of confusion about pachycephalosaurs in general (and Pachycephalosaurus in particular) at the genus and species level. It may well be the case that many “diagnosed” genera of pachycephalosaurs actually represent the growth stages of already-named species; for example, both Dracorex and Stygimoloch may well turn out to belong under the Pachycephalosaurus umbrella (which will no doubt be a major disappointment to Harry Potter fans!).

Reblogged from earthandanimals

awkwardsituationist:

photos by (click pic) timm schamberger, julia ormond, gary carter and jeff clow. (more precious lil buddies)

creatures-alive:

Corallus caninus (Emerald tree boa) by Fredrik Tegnér on Flickr.

Reblogged from morelia-viridis

creatures-alive:

Corallus caninus (Emerald tree boa) by Fredrik Tegnér on Flickr.

averymuether:

This is another info graphic I did advocating for snakes. When spring comes around snakes start to come out of hibernation and sometimes will end up in people’s backyards. Snakes around this time are killed left and right, whether it is completely harmless or venomous. I want to urge people to learn about snakes and also to leave snakes alone!

Reblogged from shadowboa

averymuether:

This is another info graphic I did advocating for snakes. When spring comes around snakes start to come out of hibernation and sometimes will end up in people’s backyards. Snakes around this time are killed left and right, whether it is completely harmless or venomous. I want to urge people to learn about snakes and also to leave snakes alone!

nemi-black:

Desert rain frog (Breviceps macrops) —so cute! &lt;3

Reblogged from crotalinae

nemi-black:

Desert rain frog (Breviceps macrops) —so cute! <3